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3 edition of Intellectual property, the developing countries, and economic development found in the catalog.

Intellectual property, the developing countries, and economic development

Shahid Alikhan

Intellectual property, the developing countries, and economic development

by Shahid Alikhan

  • 107 Want to read
  • 20 Currently reading

Published by Rajiv Gandhi Institute for Contemporary Studies in [New Delhi] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Developing countries.
    • Subjects:
    • Intellectual property -- Developing countries.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementShahid Alikhan.
      SeriesRGICS paper ;, no. 14
      ContributionsRajiv Gandhi Institute for Contemporary Studies.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsMicrofiche 97/60075 (H)
      The Physical Object
      FormatMicroform
      Pagination82 p.
      Number of Pages82
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL640801M
      LC Control Number96905826

      Keywords: Intellectual property rights; Innovation; Economic development 1. Introduction The protection of intellectual property rights (IPRs) in developing countries has been a much debated issue in recent years. This debate is often placed in a North–South framework, where the predominant view is that southern (developing) countries tend to. Intellectual property is at the heart of modern economic life. In many countries, investment in intangible assets is growing faster than investment in tangible assets. Policy makers - whether in rich or poor economies - seek to promote an intellectual property framework that is conducive to innovation and economic growth.

      The studies presented point to an important development dimension to the protection of intellectual property. But a one-size fits all approach to intellectual property is unlikely to work. There is need to adjust intellectual property norms to domestic needs, taking into account developing countries’ capacity to innovate, technological needs. An important question for many countries is whether stricter enforcement of intellectual property laws is a good strategy for economic growth. This chapter examines the role of intellectual property rights in economic growth, utilizing cross-country data on patent protection, trade regime, and country-specific by:

      The Role of Intellectual Property in Economic, Social and Cultural Development The following chapters will first discuss certain premises and truisms about the nature and importance of intellectual property and then deal with economic aspects, such as, investment correlation and effects of piracy. Size: KB. Primo Braga, C. () 'Trade-related intellectual property issues: the Uruguay Round Agree-IPR and Economic Development ment and its economic implications', in W. Martin and A. .


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Intellectual property, the developing countries, and economic development by Shahid Alikhan Download PDF EPUB FB2

The book underscores how strategic use of the intellectual property system can add value to these assets, illustrating Dr. Idris's central message, that intellectual property is a "power tool" for economic growth that is not yet being used to optimal effect in all countries, particularly in the developing world.

The Development Agenda is the result of the recent campaign to ensure that the intellectual property treaty regime permits -- and, indeed, empowers -- developing countries to tailor their intellectual property laws as they deem necessary to promote development and serve the welfare of their : Hardcover.

See Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development, Economic Arguments for Protecting Intellectual Property Rights Effectively (). Because U.S. exporters have more of a stake the developing countries protecting intellectual property than do other industrialized countries, the U.S.'s more pronounced assertiveness seems to be justified.

interfaces with development in different socio-economic contexts. Legislative reform in the field of intellectual property, and the modernization of the IP infrastructures of many countries has raised expectations on how the IP system can be used to promote economic development.

In the field of economics, the literature on intellectual property. promoted Intellectual property a weaker intellectual property regime than reflected in TRIPS, or at the minimum a markedly different regime. In particular, we show that the current global regime of intellectual property rights is inadequate in serving the purpose of economic development and welfare.

We then examine an extensive set of case. The crucial question is whether or not the extension of IP regimes assists developing countries in obtaining access to such technologies, and whether and how intellectual property right protection might help developing countries to achieve economic and social development and to reduce poverty.

In this chapter we examine: • The rationale for. It is our contention that intellectual property is a key to technological and economic development,1 even for developing countries.2 Thus for any developing country, it can never be out of fashion to interrogate the relationship between its intellectual property policy and its development.

Since he has served as a Professor of Economics at the University of Venice (Ca'Foscari). In he was appointed co-director (with Giovanni Dosi and Joseph Stiglitz) of two task forces: Industrial Policy and Intellectual Property Rights Regimes for Development (Initiative for Policy Dialogue, Columbia University, New York).Cited by: relevant to the experience of developing countries today.

The study offers policy options regarding key issues in national intellectual property regimes and legislation, the broader policy framework, and the international arena. National Intellectual Property Regimes and Legislation Size: KB.

Downloadable. Given the importance of innovation for the development and economic growth in developing countries, we therefore consider it necessary to examine the relationship between intellectual property rights (IPR) and innovation. In order to test this relationship, we use of panel data for a sample of 13 developing countries over the period from to Author: Emna Rassâa, Hafedh Ben Abdennebi.

The international community has paid considerable attention to problems associated with intellectual property that poor countries buy-such as the increased cost of pharmaceuticals brought on by the WTO's agreement on the Trade Related Aspects of. For most countries, economic development involves a process of 'catching up' with leading countries at the time.

This is never achieved solely by physical assets and labour alone: also needed are the accumulation of technological capabilities, educational attainment, entrepreneurship, and the development of the necessary institutional infrastructure.

Protection of intellectual property rights (IPRs) serves a dual role in economic development. While it promotes innovation by providing legal protection of inventions, it may retard catch-up and learning by restricting the diffusion of innovations. Does stronger IPR protection in a developing country encourage technology development in or technology transfer to that country.

This book. Intellectual property rights and economic development (English) Abstract. Over the past decade, the production of intellectual property rights (IPRs) has undergone tremendous changes--fostered on the one hand, by a widening of the range of products and technologies covered by proprietary rights and on the other hand, by policy Cited by: Intellectual property and development: Lessons from recent economic research (Inglês) Resumo.

How will developing countries fare in this new international environment. This book brings together empirical research that assesses the effects of changing intellectual property regimes on various measures of economic and social performance-ranging Cited by: / Franceso Laforgia, Fabio Montobbio, and Luigi Orsenigo --The production of knowledge, innovation and IP in developing countries: creative industries and the development agenda / Diana V.

Barrowclough --Arab musiconomics, culture, copyright, and the commons / Nagla Rizk --Trading copyright: global pressure on local culture / Michael D. The WIPO Development Agenda is the fruition of developing countries' most recent campaign to ensure that the intellectual property treaty regime permits -- and, indeed, empowers -- developing countries to tailor their intellectual property laws as they deem necessary to promote development and serve the welfare of their citizens.

He examines the influence of economic theory on the study of intellectual property in relation to economic growth in developing countries; the impact of intellectual property protection on the economic development process in Brazil and Mexico; and the impact of weak intellectual property protection on research activity at traditional technology.

Ironically, developing countries’ own economic development opportunities and intellectual property development potential are inhibited by their own weak intellectual property protections. Some countries not on the global technological frontier have used a strategy of intellectual property theft as part of attempts to catch : Stephen Ezell, Nigel Cory.

The book examines the correlation between Intellectual Property Law – notably copyright – on the one hand and social and economic development on the other. The main focus of the initial overview is on historical, legal, economic and cultural. The Development Agenda is the fruition of developing countries' most recent campaign to ensure that the intellectual property treaty regime permits—and, indeed, empowers—developing countries to tailor their intellectual property laws as they deem necessary to promote development and serve the welfare of their citizens.Abstract How will developing countries fare in this new international environment?

This book brings together empirical research that assesses the effects of changing intellectual property regimes on various measures of economic and social performance-ranging from international trade, foreign investment and competition to innovation and access to new technologies.This essay focuses on the impact of intellectual property rights (IPRs) on low- and middle-income countries’ health care.

There are two different reasons why poor countries may not have access to needed vaccines and drugs. In the case of global diseases, such as diabetes or cancer, patents may hinder the diffusion of pharmaceuticals.

In the case of neglected or tropical diseases.